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No More Gun Shows in Oklahoma?

Gun shows in Oklahoma as we know them could become a thing of the past if SB1347 passes the legislature and gets signed into law.

Apparently, the OKC Chamber is dancing to the political tune piped by Bloomberg and De Blasio et al, and trying to get gun shows kiboshed in Oklahoma. Oklahoma State Capitol Building vertical

The Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce attempted to outlaw gun shows at public venues statewide by sponsoring SB 1347 this legislative session.

Senate Bill 1347 was filed February 1, 2016 by Sen. Don Barrington at the OKC Chamber’s request. Gun shows at publicly owned venues, such as the fairgrounds in Tulsa, Oklahoma City, and countless other cities and counties across the state will be terminated. After the bill’s second reading on February 2nd, it was referred to the Public Safety Committee where it currently awaits action.

Current state law maintains that you cannot have a firearm in a public building in which the government is doing business with the public.

U.S. Law Shield Oklahoma Independent Program Attorney Robert Robles stated “SB 1347 removes the phrase ‘for the purpose of conducting business with the public’  which means you could not have any firearm in any government building—for any reason at any time—which essentially outlaws gun shows at publicly owned venues.”

“You could still have the gun show,” Robles says, “but you couldn’t bring any guns into the building.”

The proposed legislation, SB1347, would amend 21 O.S. 2011, Section 1277 to read:

UNLAWFUL CARRY IN CERTAIN PLACES

A. It shall be unlawful for any person in possession of a valid handgun license issued pursuant to the provisions of the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act to carry any concealed or unconcealed handgun into any of the following places:

  1. Any structure, building, or office space which is owned or leased by a city, town, county, state or federal governmental authority;

What is appalling, is that SB1347 conflicts with SB1057, signed into law by the Governor a few weeks ago, that becomes effective November 1, 2016.

SB1057 amends 21 O.S. 2011, Section 1277 to read:

UNLAWFUL CARRY IN CERTAIN PLACES

A. It shall be unlawful for any person in possession of a valid handgun license issued pursuant to the provisions of the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act to carry any concealed or unconcealed handgun into any of the following places:

  1. Any structure, building, or office space which is owned or leased by a city, town, county, state or federal governmental authority for the purpose of conducting business with the public;

While SB1057 retains the current “for the purpose of conducting business with the public” language, SB1347 eliminates the phrase.

NOTE: SB1057 effectively closed a loophole that permitted local governments banning firearms at all city festivals on government property, now, the ban will be limited to state fairs at the OKC and Tulsa fairgrounds.  However, it does so but with a silver lining by amending 21.O.S. 2011, Section 1290.22  under paragraph E:

E. The carrying of a concealed or unconcealed firearm by a person who has been issued a handgun license on property that has signs prohibiting the carrying of firearms shall not be deemed    a criminal act but may subject the person to being denied entrance onto the property or removed from the property. If the person refuses to leave the property and a peace officer is summoned, the person may be issued a citation for an amount not to exceed Two Hundred Fifty Dollars ($250.00).

Insiders from OK2A, a second amendment lobby group, said that SB1347 is currently stuck in committee and should not escape this term. OK2A insisted, after being pressed, that the bill was dead. However, “It will be interesting to see how the legislature deals with this proposed law,” said Robles after being informed of the alleged death of SB1347.

Robles commented that bills have a nasty and peculiar way of re-animating or morphing into unpleasant riders on desired legislation and slipping out of their coffins before being properly buried.

We will continue to watch this bill’s progress and keep you informed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It will be interesting to see how the legislature deals with this proposed law,” says Robles.

We will continue to watch this bill’s progress and keep you informed.

 

 

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